Tag Archives: 太陽

14番目の月 – One Day Before the Full Moon


先週、ネバダ州にあるバレーオブファイヤー州立公園で14番目の月の撮影をしてみました。太陽が沈む前、風景がまだ明るく照らされている時、月を風景の中に入れるのがアイディアでした。アイディアは良かったけれど、出来栄えは50%で、反省点は2つとなりました。We tested shooting one day before the full moon at Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada. The idea was that we capture the Moon with a well lit landscape before sunset.  The satisfaction rate is 50%, and here are the reasons.

ISO100, 70mm, f/8.0, 1/200sec.

1. レンズの選択: これは最悪。24mm-70mm レンズしか持っていかなかったので、月の小ささに対処できなかった。70mm-200mm、もしくは 100mm-400mm レンズがあったら何とかなった。The selection of lenses: This is unforgivable.  I didn’t think that the Moon was that tiny, so I brought only my 24mm-70mm zoom lens.  

2. 光と焦点の調節: 地平線近くに見える月は、まだ太陽が沈む前だと焦点を合わせられない。空もまだ明るすぎからなのかな。夜空の星を撮る時のようにマニュアル調整してもだめ。でも、せいぜい100キロぐらいしか離れていない山でも、そこに焦点を充てると、地球から38万キロも離れている月もちゃんと撮れる。一定以上の距離の場合は、f値をそんなに上げなくてもいいということをバンちゃんに教えてもらった。The control of light and focus: I am not sure of the exact reasons, maybe because the sky was still so bright, so I couldn’t focus on the Moon at all when it was around the horizon before sunset.  I tried manual focus, but it didn’t work.  Banchan told me to focus on the most distant mountains although they were only 60 miles away.  The Moon is more than 230,000 miles away, yet it worked.  We don’t need to raise f-stop so much either for the same reason when it’s beyond a certain distance.

ISO160, 70mm, f/9.0, 1/800sec. 微かに見える月。クロップして拡大してます。The Moon is visible faintly. Enlarged the image by cropping.

こうして書き並べてみると、自分の準備不足に呆れてしまう。カメラ技術が限りなくゼロに近いように思えます。As I listed up above, I feel I have almost no knowledge of technical photography. I really regretted that I didn’t prepare for this.

ISO100, 70mm, f/8.0, 1/200sec.

とは言え、バンちゃんのアドバイスとLiteRoomの編集で、ある程度のレベルまで持っていけたと思います。Having said that, I still recovered some shots up to a certain level with Lightroom editing.

ISO100, 50mm, f/80, 1/160mm

月が出るのを待っている間のショットの中にはいいものもありました。I found some nice shots while we waited for the Moon to rise.

太陽の光を受けた岩の光の反射が作り出した仄かな光。The gentle reflection light created by rocks getting direct sunlight.